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Angry Birds sells 6.5M copies without advertising once.

17 Aug

Rovio sells 6.5M copies of Angry Birds without advertising once

I got to meet the creators of Angry Birds back at E3 earlier this year, but because of our busy schedules, didn’t get too much of a chance to really talk with them in-depth about their experience on the App Store so far. Fortunately, GamesBeat has done just that, providing a nice profile of Rovio’s Peter Vesterbacka and Mikael Hed, the two Finnish creators of one of the App Store’s most popular titles. They’re actually mobile app veterans — while Angry Birds is their biggest hit as a company, they’ve also developed for lots of other groups, including Real Networks and Electronic Arts.

The game was created to be casual, open to anyone to play, and use some really memorable characters that would resonate with anyone who picked it up. They accomplished those goals — the game has found a surprising following around the world, and almost everyone who owns an iPhone recognizes the birds and pigs characters. A US$4.99 iPad version has also taken off, and Rovio plans to bring the app to lots of other mobile devices as well. The growth has been entirely organic, too — they haven’t spent a single cent on advertising the game, instead relying completely on word-of-mouth and Apple’s own promotional tools.

And while their success is already quite widespread, the two say their goals are even bigger than what they’ve accomplished so far: they hope to eventually see 100 million paid downloads. Definitely possible — it’s interesting to see how iPhone-created brands are growing so quickly.

Arrival of the Google Phone: $180 on Contract, $530 Unlocked

5 Jan

My brief assessment: Google’s not changing the game today. The Nexus One carried the same price like all the other smartphones: $180 with a T-Mobile contract, or $530 unlocked, both available through Google’s online store.  All in all the major blog have already reviewed and played extensively with the Nexus One, so the only mystery was the price unveiled today.  It’s not “free” as lots of people had hoped for given Google’s track record, but it’s still a great smartphone at a competitive price that will undoubtedly increase the unstoppable trend of more and more mobile web users in the future. According to one statistic, mobile web users will outnumber regular web users by 2015! We’ll talk again in 2015…

Posted via email from Connected Marketing

What Do Seniors Do Online? Visit Facebook and YouTube, of Course

11 Dec

Research done by Nielsen confirmed a trend that we’ve seen in recent years: more and more seniors are becoming active on the web. In November of 2004, there were 11.3 million active seniors online. In November 2009, that number jumped by 55% to 17.5 million. In addition, they spend more time on the web, totaling an average of 58 hours a month in front of the browser – just look at the data above.

Posted via web from Eric’s online marketing blog

Social Networking Chronological Graph with Number of Members

7 Dec

Posted via web from Eric’s online marketing blog

B2B vs. B2C Marketing: Differences in Social Media Initiatives

4 Dec

Very telling statistics realeased by eMarketer this morning for B2B & B2C Socail Media usage:

Leading Social Media Initiatives Among B2B and B2C Companies in North America, September 2009 (% of respondents)

Not only are B2B firms more likely overall to maintain a social network profile, they are managing profiles across more social networks and are significantly more likely to be present on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube. On the other side, B2C companies are more likely to maintain Facebook and MySpace profiles.

Social Networking Sites on Which B2B and B2C Companies in North America Manage Profiles, September 2009 (% of respondents)

B2B social media users are more active in measuring most social success metrics. Although B2C companies are more likely than B2B firms to use revenues to measure their efforts, more B2Bs are looking at Web traffic, brand awareness, and prospect lead quality and volume. Web traffic was the top metric for both types of company.

Ver interesting is that 60% of B2B respondents used the online marketing best practice of Twitter search to monitor mentions of their company or brand, but only 35% of B2C companies dis this.

Posted via web from Eric’s online marketing blog

Shoppers use Smartphones to Study, Find, and Buy

1 Dec


By Colby E. Ware for USA TODAY

Mobile phones are now commonplace anywhere: the office, the home, in the car, and of course while shopping. With the increased capabilities that Smartphones offer it’s only natural that they are now doing the heavy-lifting for shoppers when it comes to doing their homework. Phones help shoppers find coupons, store locations and even discover nearby restaurants.

2009 will go down as the first holiday season that retailers are (finally) trying to capitalize on the still niche, but quickly expanding, market of mobile shoppers.

According to a Deloitte survey, about 20% of Americans will use their mobile devices for shopping during the 2009 holiday season. As is to be expected, the percentage is twice as high for young consumers (18-29). Young Shoppers say they’ll use their phones to find store locations, receive coupons and information for sales and to research products and prices.

Now for the most exciting statistic: One-quarter of all who plan to use their phones to shop say they will make purchases on the devices.

Given, the mobile shopping market is still relatively small, even if the sales numbers look impressive at $750 million. But looking at the bigger picture this represents about half of 1% of all online sales.

The trade publication Internet Retailer reported month that 112 retailers have “m-commerce” sites or apps.

Here are a few big boys joining the fun: Toys R Us, Walgreens, American Eagle, Best Buy and  Victoria’s Secret recently added mobile sites. Sears and Kmart were one of the first major U.S. retailers to offer a mobile site, last year.

THE ANTI-BLACK FRIDAY


Given the crazies out on Black Friday, the ability to use a mobile device from your couch, bed or kitchen to do price comparisons, check product availability and simply look for other bargains can be invaluable.

How Black Friday Works: Stores offer “door-buster” deals to entice people to come in, knowing they’ll buy more once inside the store. Many such discounts are advertised in advance, letting shoppers do price comparisons from home. But many deals aren’t promoted ahead of time, and other products that aren’t deals are strategically placed around stores.

Here’s where the Smartphone comes in: Consumers now browse the Web from the sales floor for product and price comparisons can save time and money. According to Nita Rollins, a futurist with the digital marketing agency Resource Interactive, “the majority of American consumers will be mobile device-centric in a few years. Now that it’s technologically feasible, possessing such power literally in the palm of our hands is quite irresistible.”

M-COMMERCE EXAMPLES


  • Best Buy has had a mobile site since June 2009, however it did not became fully functioning for purchases until the end of September. Michele Azar, Best Buy’s vice president of emerging channels, says even though the retailer thought it important for customers to be able to buy easily on their devices, she says that wasn’t the driving force behind the move to mobile.
  • Toys R Us added a mobile site right before the Black Friday craziness. Greg Ahearn, senior vice president of marketing and e-commerce, says it’s designed so consumers can quickly find stores, get “mom ratings” and product descriptions, and make purchases.

“Mobile technology use is growing among all age ranges,” says Ahearn. ” Some youngsters have their own phones and are looking things up, showing them to Mom and Dad and putting the items on their holiday wish lists.”

  • EBay’s mobile website attracts 1 million visitors a day. They  expects its mobile commerce – which includes a new iPhone deals app – to quadruple in 2010, and says it will have $500 million in revenue in 2009.

“It’s quite possible more people this year will use mobile commerce through eBay and avoid the stores altogether,” says Steve Yankovich, eBay’s vice president of business solutions and mobile.

USING MOBILE TO HELP TEENS AND MOMS SHOP

According to a Resource Interactive study mothers remain the “chief purchasing officers,” and children are the “chief influencing officers.” Teens are using the Internet and their mobile devices influence the brands and products their families bought.

A Mom’s perspective after conducting a purchase via a Smartphone: “I still have much greater comfort level with my PC, but if I came to find (buying) was quick and efficient on my phone, I most definitely would do that – I’m on the road a lot.”

To facilitate the way young shoppers use their phones as tools of influence, Resource Interactive developed a prototype app that would allow teens to e-mail their parents photos from retail websites and get theirs and others’ opinions. If the parents approved, at the click of a button they could authorize the teens to buy the product using an alternative payment site such as BillMyParents.com.

THE FUTURE OF MOBILE COMMERCE?


Is Mobile the future of eCommerce? No not yet but we should definitely start talking about mCommerce, as people never have their cell phone more than 1 foot away from them, so it’s only logical that the combination of more power, faster internet, and more tech-savyness are leading to the rise of “mCommerce.”

Posted via web from Eric’s online marketing blog

General Motti / Darth Vader Star Wars Facebook Status Update

29 Nov

Posted via web from Eric’s online marketing blog

Han Solo Star Wars Facebook Status Update

29 Nov

Facebook, what would the world be like without you? Good question. Now at least we know what Facebook would be like with Han Solo on it.

Posted via web from Eric’s online marketing blog

iPhone and Android now total 75% of U.S. smartphone web traffic

23 Nov

Filed under: Odds and ends, Surveys and Polls, iPhone

iPhone and Android now total 75% of U.S. smartphone web traffic

by Mel Martin (RSS feed) on Nov 23rd 2009 at 2:30PM

It’s a rather stunning number from AdMob in an October report. The firm reports on web requests from thousands of sites world wide. In the latest report, Apple has 55% of the domestic Smartphone traffic share, and Android has 20%. Interestingly, the Blackberry share dropped 2% to a 12 percent share, and Palm’s webOS dropped from a 10% share to 5%.Windows Mobile OS has 4% of the U.S. Smartphone web traffic.

The AdMob statistics do not show handset sales, but rather are calculated by measuring traffic on more than 15,000 web sites and applications.

The Motorola Droid, running only on Verizon, has captured 24% of all Android traffic, even thought it has been out only a few weeks.

The iPhone has been on the market for 28 months. That 55% share of traffic is a pretty robust number for such a relatively new product. The Android numbers, especially those of the Droid are also good news for Google, Motorola and Verizon.

The balance of Smartphone data may change dramatically as the holiday season unwinds, and it will be interesting to watch the ebb and flow of the competing brands.

AdMob was recently purchased by Google. Apple also had reportedly had some interest in the company.

Incredible statistics for both the iPhone and the Android (the Verizon Droid in particular).

Posted via web from Eric’s online marketing blog

Facebook Uncool for 18-24s? All of this has happened before

16 Nov

To steal a line from Battlestar Galactica: All of this has happened before and all of it will happen again:

A group, in this case college age kids, discover an online sanctuary just to find out that everyone they have ever been in contact with including their parents are on it. First it was MySpace and everyone moved to Facebook, a safe haven for college age kids that required a .edu email address to join. This meant no parents, no relatives, no spam, no junk.

Then Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook decides that he needs to monetize Facebook and rake in the ca$h. He opens it up to everyone and there was only a tiny initial wave of users that committed Facebook-icide including myself (I only came back 2 years later because as a marketer I couldn’t miss out on this phenomenon). Then around this time last year, so November 2008, I started hearing stories that people’s parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles were now on Facebook and seeking them out – as if it wasn’t already awkward enough dodging Aunt Beth at the annual Thanksgiving dinner, but now people had to do it online? That’s where where many people are drawing the line.

Now Adweek throws out an article today about how Facebook is “getting” uncool for 18-24s (a.k.a. the college crowd) – to the surprise of many, but not people that have been following the pulse of this development.

Back to Battlestar Galactica: All of this has happened before and all of it will happen again.

So, now the (1 Billion Dollar) question is: What is next great thing that the kids are going to migrate to?
Twitter? I see twitter more as a compliment to Facebook and not a direct competitor. Sure there are people that only use twitter or Facebook, but they are such different beasts that they don’t directly compete.
Leapfish? I doubt that they can fill the shoes of Facebook as Leapfish is an aggregator, but not a source like Facebook or Twitter.

The only thing that is for sure is that “All of this has happened before and all of it will happen again.”

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